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Transformational Training

hearteyesIt takes so little effort to make a connection, a lasting connection that can have a profound affect on another.   Even strangers.  Who cannot speak.
In this article, Mia Tango writes so beautifully about her grandmother’s roommate, and how a simple, kind exchange began a healing.  She shares that their entire relationship may have only been 30 minutes long.  For me, that’s writing a blog post, or getting ready in the morning.  I keep thinking about all the “30 minutes” there are.  And the opening she talks about really only took a few minutes.
It is an inspiring example of the lasting effects of our presence has in hospice, whether it be at the bedside, or just casually crossing paths with another.   We can always offer a smile or a kind word creating momentary intimacy.  We’ll never know the exponential effect of that, but it is fun to imagine the ripples.
Enjoy!
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In our Hospice Training, we offer the visual of  “a big heart with ears” .  Seeing and hearing through your heart changes the view and the message.   It makes it much sweeter.
Learn more about how your volunteers, staff, family caregivers AND referral sources can be engaged and inspired to work with YOUR agency, rather than your competitors.

So get the tissues out…

Do you care like this??

This young brother and sister team is a world unto itself, with the brother as it’s gatekeeper and caregiver…the sister, a happy and knowing recipient.

These kids remind us of what it is like to care so deeply, so intensely.

Has it been a while since you cared like this?

A film by Rob Gaut. More at Five Story Pictures.  
Video from KarmaTube

Feel that connection again, and see how our online hospice volunteer and staff training can evoke the same open-hearted experience, while deeply informing, and attracting the volunteers so vital to your program!
Also learn how our Family Caregiver Training attracts early referrals before your competitors know about them!

Call or contact us for a Demo

It’s Time…Get Online 

In this interesting and *kind* article, the author lays out the fact that although many doctors order up loads of life saving measures for their patients–they rarely do so for themselves.

I say “kind” because as you read, the tone is not one of blame, but feels more like taking responsibiliPressReleaseImagety for one’s own wishes, and conveying them before the panic and chaos of ER visits, ICU, tubes and vents.

If doctors handle their own deaths differently, where’s the disconnect for the rest of us?

This is a good read..
How Doctors Die

This may be a way to broach the subject of advance directives differently than “I should be talking about this, blah, blah….”  Maybe if we knew what doctors knew that informs their end-of-life scenario very differently– we’d want more of THAT.

National Health Care Decision Day is on April 16th, 2014.
Here’s a resource for more info:  http://www.nhdd.org/

Learn how YOU can “do death differently” by taking this training.

Hospices>>>>> Click Here

Individuals, Personal or Professional Caregivers>>>>> Click Here

Peggy Harris learned of her husband’s legacy 68 years later– she waited and wondered.

Had it not been for some family member’s curiosity, and the power of “asking again and being determined to find the truth”–she may have never known that a county far away celebrated her husband and never forgot him and the sacrifice he made.

As a glaring, extreme example–sometimes “just asking” is powerful.
We may choose not to do so, because we think “this is just the way it is”, “nothing can be done”, or “my hands are tied”.

Many amazing things may lie just beyond our vision.

Perhaps one of those amazing things is the way in which you can inspire your volunteers and staff.
If what you are doing now is working…make it better.

If what you are doing now is not working–don’t wait and wonder any more…
“Do it Differently” and leave an amazing legacy in your organization.

Let us help you do that.

“Just Ask” for a DEMO of our Video-based, Online Hospice Volunteer Training and Certification program–Along with our New Family Caregiver Training (FCT) designed to attract early referrals before your competitors ever know they exist.

Complete the web-form at our website to get more information AND a “Sneak Preview” of the training .
Don’t forget to confirm your opt-in, so we can keep you up to date.

Call us to discuss how you can get this program at no charge, just by thinking a little outside the box.

We’ve got some cool legacies waiting!

 

A 3 minute look…..We tend to steer clear of thinking about these things, yet there are effects or impacts on the costs of the “death biz” .   We take no position here, but share this as an interesting look at some statistics, and really fascinating ways to literally “recycle” ourselves .   Geez, the ultimate in environmental friendliness!  Who knew we were ALL diamonds in the rough!

Learn more about how YOU and/or your hospice can be a “Change Agent” with video-based online hospice volunteer training

Video from KarmaTube

The “Power of Words” to change a thought , an experience, a mind, a life, and perhaps even a death is….well, powerful.

Here, a blind man is ignored until a stranger changes some words on his sign.  See what happens…

Learn more about how YOU and/or your hospice can be a “Change Agent” with video-based online hospice volunteer training

2:53 Seconds to Empathy

Most of us haven’t ever really thought of “sympathy” and “empathy” as that far apart in meaning.

We tend to lump them together, but  Brene Brown’s words in this lovely, funny animation shows us how how far apart they can be…

film by RSA AnimateVideo from KarmaTube

To learn more about our Video-Based, Online Hospice Volunteer Training that that engages and inspires… Click here and Complete the Web Form for a “Sneak Preview”

 

 

http://prevos.net/wp-content/uploads/2005/09/is-there-life-after-death.jpg

Photo taken from the Horizons of Reason Blog – Peter Prevos

It’s a silly debate really, but not a silly subject.

I distinguish the two because there are questions that will never be answered [at least not to everyone’s mutual satisfaction], so why enter into an often heated debate about something that is unknowable (until we get there..and even then…).  Opinions expressed are fine, but on this topic, it can sometimes get nasty.

But the question itself is so very important that the religions of the world from Christianity, Hinduism, Buddhism, Islam and more, are built on it, as well as other beliefs that may tangent from traditional ones, but still–ingrained beliefs, they are.

The “silly” part is not that the topic is trivial–to the contrary…

The silly part, IMHO is because these debates can divide us–and why at such a sacred and important passage would we want to be separate?

Even these “in stone” beliefs can blur at the moment of death, and if we’re not open to the possibilities, we may miss amazing things that happen.

My mother, Dagmar, was a confirmed atheist.  She had her “engraved in stone” beliefs that there was no such thing as God, or an afterlife, angels, demons or any non-earthly existence.  She used to say that when you die, you are “splat, like a bug on a rug”.  Hmmm…Not very romantic for my tastes.  She vehemently honored the beliefs of others, but couldn’t embrace them as her own, and in this way was quite the existentialist–finding her own meaning and belief in the human condition alone.

I asked her when she was in the nursing home, after she had made a choice for death–a conscious one, knowing she was not going to recover this time, whether she believed she would see my dad, her husband of 50 years when she got to the other side.  She said, “That’d be nice, but not gonna happen…”, with a wave of the hand, as if to say…”you believe that crap?”

So, how interesting it was when Dagmar, my atheist mom, was only a few days from death when she began to look heavenward and talk to entities unseen.  I mean, long, detailed conversations, though unintelligible to me. Every once in a while during these conversations, she would “light up”, eyes big with a huge smile on her face, and her hands pulled over her heart, in what looked like the most glorious surprise to her.   Still knowing who I was, she kept asking me to clarify where she was.  I knew she wasn’t asking for the mailing address.

So a couple of times I said…”You’re on Earth”.

She smiled with that kind of smile that means…”I know something you don’t”…and got back to her conversations.

I mention this because no matter how much she believed that there was no God, no afterlife, no hubby with whom to reunite, she certainly was engaged in deep connection with something that was not of this realm.  Was she wrong then? Was she hallucinating? I don’t know.

All I know is that I am open to all sorts of possibility.

I had debated with her years before about her beliefs.  I had different views than she –not religious, but spiritual, and I thought my beliefs were “right”.  I remember being angry with her because she was so freakin’ definite about what I saw as very narrow beliefs.

And something changed for her on her deathbed. I don’t know what.

Right or wrong, hallucinations or a conversations with God, himself…

It was just silly to debate.

 

If you are an individual who is drawn to work with the dying, or a personal or professional caregiver who wants to learn how to “BE” with the dying…

Look and learn here….

There is a club for those of us who CHOOSE to work with people who are dying.  “Work” may mean for hire or for volunteering one’s time–but it is a choice to do so.  It a choice that gives back more than is given.  We are drawn perhaps to the mystery, or to the divine.  Maybe it is an unknowable inspiration that places this calling in one’s heart…All the while,  most others shy away, or think we’re crazy.

In this club, there are no dues, we don’t have a regular gathering place, and we don’t recruit members, but…
when you meet someone who feels the same way–someone who “gets it”, but can’t explain it, like you–it is a  big exhale.

It’s almost like church, a community of people who are SpiralChurch_smallerFile
scattered about doing this work-separately, but together
in hospices, nursing homes,  hospitals, and in private homes across the planet.

We’re all linked by a knowing, by that thing that draws
us closer to the delicious mystery of death.

I can’t explain it, but it feels sacred to be in the presence
of one who is dying.  Even as a life is ending, I feel even more alive.  That’s part of the gift I can’t explain–to be more aware of one’s own aliveness.  And when that is happening, I can feel the compassion in me expanding and almost bursting forth as I spend time with the families who are grieving.  The compassion does not take sides– it is for both the one who is doing the tough work of exiting this earth and it is there just as powerfully for the ones who remain.

Compassion simply abounds.

If you want this too–find out how, here…

Beautiful does not always mean easy, pretty, neat and OK.

Beautiful can mean raw, heart-felt, gut-wrenching and hollow.

This writer describes the experience of another’s impending death with amazing prose, and the veil of neatness is pulled away, yet it is still lovely and draws you in.

Some would say that this “pretties up” what death is all about.
I say– what if we re-framed it such as this,  without ignoring the realities.

Maybe, maybe not…

“…we were co-explorers as she pulled nearer and nearer to death. Tentatively, we stepped from stone to stone, figuring out how one goes about dying:…”

I say this is beautiful….
The Leavetaking